How We Approach Reducing Meltdowns with a Variation Budget

The following article was written by writer and public autistic advocate Jamie Knight. Many autistic individuals speak of the fatigue they experience navigating a neurotypically-dominant society on a daily basis and the stress sudden changes can cause. In this post, Jamie offers a unique representation of how he handles the stress that comes with the inevitable changes and unpredictability of life. This post was originally published on his blog Spaced Out & Smiling on July 6, 2017 and is reprinted here with his permission.

Why Educating Autistic Children About Sexual Safety Matters

The following article is written by Madison Cannon Beresford and is published here with his permission. Madison is writer, autistic advocate, PhD clinician, husband, and father of three boys, one of whom is also on the autism spectrum. Madison enjoys working to support autistic individuals and their families through emotional and practical care as a family counselor. He is a contributor to The Mighty and works with The Autistic Cooperative, running the blog “Embracing Atypical.” His article addresses the way autistics fit into the #metoo movement and the need to provide a safe education to those in the autistic community.

Autism Interview #73: Austin Shinn on Advocacy in Childhood, College, and Beyond

Austin Shinn is an author, editor, film buff, husband, father, and advocate for individuals diagnosed with autism. Austin is diagnosed with Aspergers and blogs mostly about his life with perspectives on autism, disability, and advocacy at A Flickering Life. He is also the author of A Flickering Life: A Memoir of Autism, which chronicles his struggle to live life no different than anyone else. This week he shared some specific supports and advocacy strategies that resonated with him in childhood, his college years, and adulthood, and offered advocacy advice for parents and caregivers of other autistics. …

I Look Back At My Parents and Wonder: How Did They Miss Me?

This article was written by autistic advocate Kieran Rose and was originally published on his website The Autistic Advocate. It is reprinted here with his permission.

I look around at my life now and I see a wife and children, who I love beyond imagining and I think to myself “If there was something wrong, something out of the ordinary, would I see it, would I miss it?”

Then I look back at my parents and wonder: how did they miss me?

Addressing the Fear of an Autism Diagnosis

This article is written by Annabelle Short, a mother with Asperger’s and an advocate for children with special needs. Annabelle Short works with several organizations to provide families with the best resources for raising and educating a special needs child. When not working, she’s spending time with her family or putting pen to paper for her own personal pursuits. She also loves sewing and making crafts with her two children.

Autism Interview #60: Michael John Carley on the Current State of Autism

Michael John Carley is an internationally-recognized autistic author, speaker, and public advocate. He is the founder and first Executive Director of GRASP, the largest organization in the world comprised of adults on the autism spectrum. He’s also the former United Nations Representative of Veterans for Peace, Inc. He’s been featured in many national publications and media outlets and has written several books on autism. This week he shared his perspective on the current state of autism in America, some of the differences between his experiences and those of his autistic son, as well as advocacy tips for parents.

How to Hide Your Autism

This article was written by autistic advocate Kieran Rose and was originally published on autismawareness.com and his website The Autistic Advocate. It is reprinted here with his permission.

If you are the parent of an Autistic child, I’m going to introduce you to a concept that’s going to scare the pants off of you:  Your child is going to grow up to be me:

I am an Autistic adult.

Some people are of the belief that Autism can be grown out, or that with the right support and interventions, Autism can be cured or lessened.

If you’re one of those people, then I’m about to blow your minds with a second concept: Nobody grows out of Autism and a child cannot be trained out of it.  We just get better at hiding it.

7 Reasons Why the Neurodiversity Movement Matters to Parents

neurodiversity for parents

How invested are you in the neurodiversity movement? The societal shift to treat autism (along with a variety of atypical neurological conditions) as a difference rather than a disease has improved autism acceptance, thereby potentially improving the quality of life for individuals on the spectrum. But it would be a mistake to think this movement is only for autistic people. Parents too have several important reasons to embrace neurodiversity.

Love on the Spectrum: 5 Considerations Regarding Spectrum Romance

This is a reposting of an article originally published on this site February 14, 2017.

Valentine’s Day can mean cute cards and fun (or stressful) holiday parties for young kids as well as bring a mixed bag of emotions for teens and adults on the spectrum. There has been a lot of media buzz about autism and relationships recently, even more so since the release of the documentary Autism in Love. Here are some suggestions from people on the spectrum about things to consider around Valentine’s Day or with romantic relationships.