Autism Interview #92: Quincy Hansen on School, Autism Acceptance, and Co-occurring Conditions

Quincy Hansen is a high school student and Autistic advocate from Denver, Colorado. Quincy has been formally diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and General Anxiety Disorder, and also has some fine motor skill impairments resulting in Dysgraphia-like symptoms. Quincy has found that writing offers a good outlet for communicating ideas that do not easily come…

Let the Disabled Community Define Inclusion

I recently saw a social media post supporting inclusion where an autistic woman commented with a warning about being “too inclusive.” What she was referring to was forceful inclusion, and gave the example of her mother removing her bedroom door at her therapist’s suggestion to improve socialization. This sounds like abuse, and the opposite of inclusion, but it’s worth mentioning because it raises the important questions of what is inclusion and who defines it?

Autism Interview #91 Part 2: Leanne Libas on Ableism

This is Part Two of a two-part interview with writer, student, and a/Autistic advocate Leanne Libas. Last week she shared her experience discovering her autism diagnosis and how she has developed a positive autistic identity through a transformative experience at a youth leadership forum. She wrote about not wanting to be cured for fear of “losing herself.” This week she discussed autism advocacy practices, different areas she notices ableism in her own life, and practical ways to combat ableism starting today in your own homes and communities.

Autism Interview #91 Part 1: Leanne Libas on Autistic Identity

Leanne Libas is a writer, college student, and a/Autistic advocate. Leanne started her advocacy work after a life-changing experience at YLF (Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities). Leanne was an Autistic Scholarship Fellowship Recipient from the Autistic Self Advocacy Network and she was a regular contributor to the Art of Autism blog. This is the first part of a two-part interview with Leanne. This week she shared her experience understanding how autism affects her and how she has adopted a positive autistic identity.

Lists of Autistic Representation in Literature

Autistic representation in literature is growing, but all portrayals are not universally favorable. There are many different ways autistic people live, so no one representation should be accepted as truth. Other controversy arises when one portrayal is so narrow that it leads to damaging misconceptions. This is a complex issue, but increasing the amount of autistic portrayals and greater exposure to autistic-authored literature featuring autistic characters should at least get our society moving in the right direction.

Autism Interview #89: Tracey Cohen on Late Diagnosis, Advocacy, and Running

Photo credit: Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Tracey Cohen is an experienced ultrarunner, author, and speaker, and has competed in thousands of races around the world. Tracey was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome at the age of 39 and speaks regularly about autism to school groups and at conferences. She is the author of Six-Word Lessons on Female Asperger Syndrome and Six-Word Lessons on the Sport of Running. This week she shared some of her experiences growing up undiagnosed, her current advocacy work, and her love of running.

Autism Interview #90: Robbie Ierubino on Art and Autism Acceptance

Portrait Photo

Robbie Ierubino is an American artist with autism studying Graphic Design at Staffordshire University in Stoke-on-Trent, England. He has developed his own style of art which he calls “shapism” and uses his art to communicate his unique world perspective and advocate for acceptance. This week he shared how autism influences his art and his passion for working to improve autism acceptance.

Autism Interview #88: Morgan Giosa on Freelancing, Music, and Art

Morgan Giosa is a 26 year-old web developer, blues guitarist, photographer, and visual artist from Connecticut. Morgan says his music and visual art ultimately come to him from his “unique and unconventional intuition and emotions, and his quirky, idiosyncratic view of the world.” This week he shared his experience as a freelance web developer, musician, and how he recently learned to embrace his Autistic identity.

Autistic and in Love: 3 Simple Guidelines for Parents

Autistic romantic relationships may look different than neurotypical ones. The best way to understand how autistic individuals can create successful romantic relationships is talking and listening to autistic people who have been in them. This article offers a simple overview for parents of three fundamental principles to remember regarding autistic involvement in romantic relationships and cites additional relationship resources for further reading.