“Suffering” Parents and Dehumanizing People on the Spectrum

There is a tendency for people on the spectrum to be portrayed as burdens to their families in the media. Sometimes this is the angle of the journalist reporting a story, and other times, it comes from the voice of a parent. Sometimes this narrative can even attempt to justify parent or caregiver murder of someone on the spectrum. Unfortunately, this portrayal has damaged public perception of autistic people, and many on the spectrum have spoken out against it.

Leveraging “Spectric” Honesty and Candor to Get Hired

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Coming of age with ADHD and aliens is tough. To survive high school, Geoff must challenge teachers, bullies, mind-meddling mutants from a parallel universe, and his own stubborn principles.

This is a guest post from writer and neurodiversity champion Claudia Casser. Claudia retired early from antitrust law to fledge her nerdy children on a working horse farm and write speculative fiction. From people to horses to parrots, none of the farm’s denizens could ever be classified as neurotypical.

Claudia’s 2016 semi-comic coming of age novel, “No Child Left Behind,” celebrates neurodiversity. Visit her website at www.ethicalantics.com, and buy her novel on Amazon.

Problems with Waiting in Line

My son is well-behaved in settings where there are clear rules and expectations and a consistent schedule; however, this environment doesn’t exist everywhere. He never has behavior problems at school or therapy, and he enjoys going to these places without feeling overwhelmed. One skill he has difficulty with in an unstructured setting is waiting in line. There are a variety of ways to teach this skill, but I’ve found it difficult to apply one strategy to the numerous different waiting scenarios we encounter in life. Parents should both teach the skill of waiting and look for catalysts that make it difficult for children to exercise the skill in certain environments.

Voices from the Spectrum #13: Anita Lesko on Health Care Consulting and Her All-Autism Wedding

Anita Lesko

Anita Lesko is the founder of the Global Autism Consulting Organization which aims to offer health care providers around the globe the knowledge and skills necessary to provide the best health care possible to their autistic patients. She and her husband Abraham assist small and large businesses in understanding their autistic employees and enabling them to incorporate people on the spectrum into their work team. Anita has an MS in Nurse Anesthesia and has been working as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist for 26 years. She didn’t receive a diagnosis until the age of 50, but since then has become an internationally recognized autism advocate. She answered questions for us about her mission to help autistic patients and workers in the health care industry as well as her all-autistic wedding.

The Roles and Responsibilities of the Neurotypical Autism Advocate

I’ve noticed recent articles and social media threads about how people on the spectrum feel exploited for their experiences. They feel as if the world sometimes treats them as if they only exist as educational vessels for the neurotypical public. This isn’t their intention, so I think it’s worth exploring why some people on the spectrum feel this way and how the neurotypical autism advocates can act differently to improve relations with the autistic community.

Autism and Changing Classroom Strategies

The following post was written by Judy Endow and published on her website JudyEndow.com on August 11, 2015. It is reprinted here with her permission. Judy is an author on the autism spectrum, private consultant, public speaker, and autism advocate. She is part of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Statewide Autism Training Team and a board member of both the Autism Society of America, Wisconsin Chapter and the Autism National Committee.