Love on the Spectrum: 5 Considerations Regarding Spectrum Romance

This is a reposting of an article originally published on this site February 14, 2017.

Valentine’s Day can mean cute cards and fun (or stressful) holiday parties for young kids as well as bring a mixed bag of emotions for teens and adults on the spectrum. There has been a lot of media buzz about autism and relationships recently, even more so since the release of the documentary Autism in Love. Here are some suggestions from people on the spectrum about things to consider around Valentine’s Day or with romantic relationships.

Autism Interview #57: Mickey Rowe on Autism and Theatre

Mickey Rowe

Mickey Rowe is the first autistic actor to play Christopher Boone in the Tony Award winning play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and one of the first autistic actors to play any autistic character. He has been featured in the New York Times, PBS, Teen Vogue, Playbill, NPR, CNN’S Great Big Story, Huffington Post and more. Mickey is also Artistic Director of Arts on the Waterfront, a high-quality free theater and arts program in downtown Seattle where many homeless community members live. This week he shared his experience working as an actor with The Indiana Repertory Theatre.

Autism Interview #54: Jennifer Elizabeth Brunton on What Neurotypical Parents of Autistic Children Need to Know

Elizabeth Brunton

Jennifer Elizabeth Brunton, Ph.D., is a writer, editor, former ethics professor, and author of the blog Full Spectrum Mama where she writes about her experience as an autistic mother raising two children, one of whom is also on the autism spectrum. This week she shared information about a new book she is working on and offered some wonderful reminders for neurotypical parents trying to raise their autistic children in the most positive and supportive environment possible.

Autism Interview #55: Haley Moss on Growing Up with a Positive Autistic Identity

Haley Moss is an artist, author, and autism advocate attending law school at the University of Miami. Her work is nationally recognized, and she is the author of “Middle School: The Stuff Nobody Tells You About” and “A Freshman Survival Guide for College Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders.” This week she shared how she grew up with a positive autistic identity and offered suggestions of ways parents and family can improve autism acceptance and advocate for their loved ones on the spectrum.

My Path to Proper Formal Autism Diagnosis–Anlor Davin

The article below was written by autistic author Anlor Davin. It was originally published on her website and is reprinted here with her permission.  Anlor Davin grew up on the West Coast of France and immigrated to the United States in her 20s. She has written about some of her experiences growing up undiagnosed in her memoir Being Seen. She also shared shared some of her experience as an autistic French immigrant to the United States in a recent interview for this blog. In this article, Anlor sheds light on the difficulty of living without a diagnosis and how we can support others with autism throughout their lives.

Autism Interview #53: Anlor on Immigration with Autism and Practicing Zen

Anlor Davin

Anlor Davin is an autistic author, blogger, and Zen student. She grew up on the West Coast of France and immigrated to the United States in her 20s and then married and had a child all before receiving an autism diagnosis. She was eventually diagnosed at 46 and detailed some of her experiences growing up undiagnosed in her memoir Being Seen. This week she shared some of her experience as an autistic French immigrant to the United States and how she used meditation to help survive and eventually flourish.

What the Autistic Community is Saying About Trump’s Tax Bill

autism and the tax bill

Congress has moved closer to turning President Trump’s tax bill into law with both the Senate and House passing different versions of it. Now a conference committee process begins where lawmakers from both sides attempt to reconcile their differences and create a mutually agreed-upon bill for the American people. One important debate will include handling a deduction that many Americans take for high medical expenses. This deduction is repealed by the House, but expanded by the Senate. Below is a brief summary of how the changes presented in the tax bill might affect disabled individuals and how the autistic community has reacted.